Meet the Fimbuls

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As promised in the last post I here bring you Borinn and Snorinn Fimbul. The father and son who lead the small band of gold fever-crazed dwarves from the second scenario in Games Workshop’s Orc’s Drift campaign from ’85. Borinn and Snorinn along with 11 other members of their race have thus settled on the plateau of Ashak Rise where they are now completely absorbed in washing gold nuggets out of the silt from the River Canis as the Severed Hand tribe come marching into the scene on their way to meet up with the rest of the orc tribes at Orc’s Drift. Combat of course ensues but the dwarves have a delightfully non-heroic objective.

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I really like this pair of miniatures. They have everything I hold dear when it comes to vintage Citadel dwarves. They are very distinct personalities and practically ooze adventure and fantasy. The pair was also very well chosen for the scenario – Borinn, the father, has a stately feel to him as he calmly smokes his pipe, while Snorinn, the son, is smaller, more slender and caught in a dynamic pose. Borinn is originally part of the Dwarf Adventurer range and his son Snorinn belongs to the range of Norse Dwarves.

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Along with the Fimbuls you see the three pack mules also part of the scenario.

All good stuff.

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Cheers

Martin

 

Hoot! Hoot! Says the giant owl

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Here’s my latest effort, the weird and wonderful Giant Owl released by Citadel in 1988. I have had my eye on this model for quite a while, but it was only after having seen Harry the Hammer’s painted specimen at this year’s BOYL that I realized that I had to get one myself.  It’s like that with us collectors, the mind works in strange ways.

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Actually I’m not completely sure why I’m so infatuated with this model. Owls are just strange creatures and there’s also something odd about this model. Something spooky, and I guess it’s all in the face of the model. However, you also need to acknowledge the dynamics of the model. Instead of just sculpting a sitting owl, which perhaps world have been the obvious and classic way to do an owl, the sculptor (not sure who made it), depicted the owl just before it’s taking off. Brilliant!

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Once I began to plan the painting of my giant owl I came to think of Celanawe and Lieam’s epic struggle against a fierce, vicious owl in David Petersen’s fine Mouse Guard series. The confrontation takes place during the winter and I was thus inspired to give my owl’s base a snow theme.

of Celanawe and Lieam’s epic struggle against a fierce, vicious owl in David Petersen’s fine Mouse Guard series

Celanawe and Lieam’s epic struggle against a fierce, vicious owl in David Petersen’s fine Mouse Guard series

I’m quite happy with the result. What do you think?

 

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Cheers

Martin

… And out come the wolves

I finished basing these two wolfies last week. It’s the “vicious giant wolf” from Citadel’s classic Monster Set from 1985. The mini is very basic and kind of static, nevertheless I really, really like it. It has a certain shaggy nastiness to it. It bit like an old scabrous dog or something like that. You get the impression that the wolf is approaching its target carefully, shown just a moment before it explodes into some sort of frenzied attack.

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