We played ’A Bridge over Troubled Water’

This Thursday I finally got around to play Paul’s ’A Bridge over Troubled Water’ scenario. The game has been a long time in coming and it certainly was worth the wait. I played with my pal Rasmus aka The Mosh-Pit Maggot at house in Jutland. Most of the minis used were mine, while we used most of his terrain as well a few of his models (the mounted ones).

We played the scenario with WFB3rd rules and adjusted the scenario and the names slightly to fit our ongoing series of battles revolving around the robber baron Alban von Edelhahn dwelling in the Black Mountains. I dare not call it a proper campaign, but it is certainly slowly getting to feel like one. This was the fourth skirmish we have played with Alban as the central character.

The lighting in the room where we played wasn’t particularly photo friendly and midway through the game I forgot to take pictures. The fog of war and all that! What I can show you here is thus mainly some pics for the sake of atmosphere. I also need to get better at taking these battle-pictures. My close-ups ended up completely blurred or overexposed due to the flash.

The greenskin forces of Ozgut - the up-and-coming orc champion

The greenskin forces of Ozgut – the up-and-coming orc champion

The scenario worked very well I think. The table looked a bit empty due to a limited amount of terrain, but once we got started it came together nicely. We agreed that crossing the river reduced movement to a quarter; this was perhaps too harsh as my orcs would experience. That being said I would certainly include more bushes and trees on the table to make it come more alive, if I was to play the scenario again.

The actual combat was a pure massacre. Alban von Edelhahn and his retinue had entered the valley to slay Durk the Troll living under a bridge over the river running through the area. They arrived in the valley just as Ozgut, an orc champion, was approaching the very same bridge in order to tame Durk.

The battlefield

The battlefield

Seeing the greenskins approach Alban ordered his men to take up a defensive position and then began firing volleys of arrows on the approaching orcs and goblins. Ozgut send his two wolves, Snapjaw and Snagtooth, across the river in an attempt to outflank Alban’s men and create some havoc among the humans. At the same time Durk got a whiff of the approaching human archers taking up their position next to the abandoned toll house by the bridge.

Durk charged out from underneath the bridge but was hit by several arrows causing wounds he failed to regenerate. Badly hurt Durk charged Alban von Edelhahn, but failed miserably in the attempt to wound him. After this Alban served a single blow to the troll and surprisingly killing the beast. This of course was a major and rather sudden setback for Ozgut and his greenskins.

The greenskin forces sneaking out through the thickets

The greenskin forces sneaking out through the thickets

The wolves crossed the river and were met by the ever-busy Alban and his hot-blooded nephew Heinrich von Edelhahn who had charged the two wolves head over heels. Snapjaw caused a wound on Heinrich before the wolf was slain by Alban, where after Snagtooth turned around and fled the combat.

Meanwhile Alban’s astronomer and counselor, the alchemist and mage Simon Rotkopf had positioned himself in front of the bridge, waiting for the approaching unit of 20 goblins led by Frinkelgob. Ozgut and his orcs were following right in the heels of the goblins and steadily suffering casualties from the arrows raining down on them. Even Alban was amazed by the success of his five archers and five men equipped with crossbows!

Alban von Edelhahn and his men taking up their defensive positions

Alban von Edelhahn and his men taking up their defensive positions

Once the goblins set foot on the bridge Simon Rotkopf released his Windblast spell and not only incapacitated the goblins, he also blocked the bridge for the orcs, leaving them stranded while the arrows kept striking home. He result wasn’t pretty. Ozgut lost all but one of his orcs and fled the table. Once Ozgut took to the hills the goblins turned around as well and Alban could celebrate his victory.

Well, as it perhaps shows, Rasmus was incredibly lucky during the game. He kept making every roll and I failed equally often when rolling for the greenskins. At least Ozgut survived to fight another day and he is certainly looking for a chance to get back at Alban.

Orcs snaking out of the forest while Snagtooth and Snapjaw are heading for the river

Orcs snaking out of the forest while Snagtooth and Snapjaw are heading for the river

The entire thing took about three hours to play, which includes setting up the table and making all the initial rolls etc. Not bad for a Thursday night.

Thanks to Paul for writing the scenario!

Alban von Edelhahn's troops

Alban von Edelhahn’s troops

 

The slow approach of the ords and goblins

The slow approach of the ords and goblins

_The goblins still have a way to go in order to reach the bridge

The goblins still have a way to go in order to reach the bridge

 

Snapjaw and Snagtooth by the river

Snapjaw and Snagtooth by the river

 

Alban's forces are ready!

Alban’s forces are ready!

The terrible troll Durk emerges from underneath the bridge

The terrible troll Durk emerges from underneath the bridge

Durk the Troll - soon to be Durk the Pincushion!

Durk the Troll – soon to be Durk the Pincushion!

Durk with one wound left!

Durk with one wound left!

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5 thoughts on “We played ’A Bridge over Troubled Water’

  1. Whoop! It’s great to see you guys playing my scenario! Hope you had fun, even if the dice had a favourite son. I will polish off the sequel and post it up soon!

    • We had a great time. It was actually quite funny to see how everything sort of collapsed around the greenskins. Very orcy in fact!

    • Boo indeed concerning unpainted miniatures! It’s a problem, I guess, we all face when gaming with friends/opponents who perhaps share our enthusiasm for the game as such but lack the interest or motivation to actually paint the minis involved. I mostly try to solve this problem by being the one planning the game and bring as many painted miniatures for the game as possible, but it’s not always enough. However, I live in the feeble hope that showing up with painted miniatures somehow will inspire my opponent to actually start painting…

      • At least you have mates with minis of their own! 😀 I have to paint anything I’m hoping to play with, AND my opponent’s stuff too. 🙂

        We’ve all been there, I am not without sin. Actually, I’ve never played a single game of 40K or WHFB with even HALF of the minis painted. One of the reasons why I don’t play that size games anymore. 😀

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